Last edited by JoJogore
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

2 edition of royal dockyards of Woolwich and Deptford. found in the catalog.

royal dockyards of Woolwich and Deptford.

Philip MacDougall

royal dockyards of Woolwich and Deptford.

by Philip MacDougall

  • 75 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19385928M

Work on ammunition was carried out in the Tilt Yard at the Palace and later moved to Woolwich to become, in due course, the Royal Arsenal. Greenwich lay between the two Royal Dockyards at Woolwich and Deptford – both producing warships in need of guns and ammunition. The Department of the Director of Dockyards, also known as the Dockyard Branch and later as the Dockyards and Fleet Maintenance Department, was the British Admiralty department responsible from to for civil administration of dockyards, the building of ships, the maintenance and repair of ships at dockyards and factories, and the supervision of all civil Headquarters: Admiralty, London.

A very important Kentish town history, and a maritime history, together with the story of the Royal Dockyards at Deptford and Woolwich, by Robert Peirce Cruden (). The subtitle “ of the Port of London” is a bit misleading, in that Gravesend is regarded as being within the “Port” and traffic is described in general terms. A blog about genealogy and family history.

The three royal naval dockyards of the Thames and Medway – Deptford, Woolwich and Chatham – were all sited up river at some distance from the sea. Ships using these yards for minor repairs and maintenance found the passage up river to be a rather tedious exercise which, for a large sailing ship relying on favourable winds and tides, might.   This year to celebrate years of Deptford and Woolwich Royal Dockyards history their AGM was followed by a conference on that very subject. The Conference was opened by Deptford MP, Joan Ruddock - with a speech expressing her support for the recognition of the Deptford Yard's history while various 'regeneration' schemes are considered.


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Royal dockyards of Woolwich and Deptford by Philip MacDougall Download PDF EPUB FB2

For the most recent account see Ann Coats, Five Hundred Years of Deptford and Woolwich Royal Dockyards and counting, Philip MacDougall, ed., Transactions of the Naval Dockyards Society, Vol Five Hundred Years of Deptford and Woolwich Royal Dockyards (Naval Dockyards Society, Portsmouth, January ), pp.

), ISBN Ann Coats ‘Five Hundred Years of Deptford and Woolwich Royal Dockyards and counting’ Philip Mac Dougall ‘The Naval Multiplex of Kentish London’ Chris Ellmers ‘Deptford private shipyards, and their relationship to Deptford Dockyard, –’ Peter Cross-Rudkin ‘John Rennie and the Naval Dockyards, –’.

Based at the Historic Dockyard in Portsmouth, Flagship Portsmouth is responsible for three of Britain's oldest and most historic warships - Henry VII's doomed flagship Mary Rose, Nelson's flagship HMS Victory and the world's first iron battleship, HMS Warrior. Deptford, the furthest upriver, focused on “smaller” vessels, and was one of six Royal shipyards: Plymouth, operating from to the present is the oldest, followed by Plymouth and Sheerness which served the needs of the home fleet; while Deptford, Woolwich, and Chatham concentrated on shipbuilding and the preparation of naval stores.

Deptford and Woolwich were chosen because they were close to his palace at Greenwich. It is recorded that Henry visited the dockyards to see shipbuilding in progress.

Woolwich was opened in when work started on Henry Grace a Dieu. Royal dockyards of Woolwich and Deptford.

book full list of all the ships made at Woolwich is available on the Kent History Forum website. To contextualise the conference, this article describes the closure of Deptford and Woolwich Dockyards and their remaining structures.

It then summarises NDS participation in Deptford Dockyard’s planning process, sinceto improve the design of Deptford’s redevelopment and protect its : Ann Veronica Coats. Our Transactions publication on Years of Deptford and Woolwich Royal Dockyards can now be bought on Amazon, see below.

It explores engineering, archaeology and planning aspects of the two dockyards, with the emphasis on Deptford/5. Portsmouth, Devonport, Chatham once brought forth millions of tons of warships. In their time other yard also served the Royal navy - Pembroke, Sheernes, Woolwich and Deptford among them.

Here is their story, with over 70 picture, mainly focusing on the four major yards. The Golden Hind remained moored in the creek until it broke up.(See the London's Lost Rivers book by Paul Talling for more on the Royal Dockyards of Deptford and Woolwich) Deptford Creek was also host to a large power station, now dismantled.

It stood at the mouth of the Creek and supplied electricity to Central London. The six major Royal Dockyards at Deptford, Woolwich, Sheerness and Chatham (all in Kent), Plymouth (Devon) and Portsmouth (Hampshire) and several smaller ones around the coast.

The merchant ports of Bristol (Gloucestershire), Harwich (Essex), London, Poole (Dorset) and Southampton (Hampshire). Royal Dockyards Officers List - I heard about this list from another researcher. It was compiled by a 'Commander May' from National Archives resources.

This Dockyards Research Guide at the National Maritime Museum explains that 'In the 17th and 18th centuries there were six Royal Navy dockyards in England, at Deptford, Woolwich, Chatham, Sheerness, Portsmouth and Plymouth.

Gift Vouchers Available. Exciting experiences await as you explore this unique destination. Climb aboard 3 historic warships (including our very own Submarine), make your own rope in our awe-inspiring Victorian Ropery and discover the year story of the Royal Dockyard at Chatham in over 10 museum galleries.

Web site: The Royal Dockyards of Deptford and Woolwich. 21 August Book: Bedford, Kristina. Woolwich Through Time. Amberley Publishing. The Survey of London: Woolwich () News: History repeating itself: Same barracks were targeted by IRA bombers nearly 40 years ago.

18 April Express. 23 May The Lenox Project, Deptford 26 Book review: This edition of Dockyards demonstrates how the Naval Dockyards Society is gaining a larger pro- supervisory officer of the Royal Engineers at Woolwich. The columns, beams and frames are cast iron and the components wrought iron; the original cladding and roofing material was corrugated File Size: 3MB.

At Woolwich I have seen a muster book of the time of Charles 1., and at Chatham, any number of volumes of Admiralty correspondence signed by his son James, afterwards James The dockyards are open to the public, under proper restrictions, but no foreigner is allowed to enter them without an express order in writing from the Lords of the.

Iron ship fitting at the Royal Dockyard, Royal Naval Dockyards In the 17th and 18th centuries there were six Royal Navy Dockyards in England, at Deptford, Woolwich, Chatham, Sheerness, Portsmouth and Plymouth. Here are some facts about Greenwich Palace. Greenwich Palace was built during the 15th century by Humphrey, the Duke of Gloucester.

It was located on the south bank of the River Thames in Greenwich, about 15 km along the river from Westminster. It was conveniently located close to the royal dockyards at Deptford and Woolwich.

The name is also recorded in the Domesday Book (). In Tudor times Woolwich became the location for one of the two royal dockyards beside the Thames founded by Henry VIII. He established the Royal Naval Dockyard (at Deptford) and Woolwich Dockyard (just to the west of the village of Woolwich).

After one year of studies in London, he went on to study shipbuilding at the British royal dockyards in Woolwich, Chatham and Deptford. [1] Chapman recorded his extensive research of British shipbuilding in several documents, including an eight-page handwritten document titled Directions for Building of a Ship of 50 Guns, where he described Born: 9 SeptemberGothenburg, Sweden.

Deptford Dockyard Explained. Deptford Dockyard was an important naval dockyard and base at Deptford on the River Thames, in what is now the London Borough of Lewisham, operated by the Royal Navy from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries.

It built and maintained warships for years, and many significant events and ships have been associated with it. In addition, the yards at Deptford and Woolwich were also engaged in constructing new ships, and had additional facilities, such as building slips, to permit the undertaking of this task.

Overall, while £30, was spent upon ship repair and building work at Deptford between andthis same period saw the much smaller sum of £6, Author: Philip Macdougall.Naval Dockyards and Their Records.

By Dr. David Davis. This article was published in the December edition of Soul Search, the journal of The Sole Society. This is the write-up of the talk given at this year’s Annual Gathering.

Dr David Davis is the former chairman of the Naval Dockyards Society.Average number of dockworkers eligible for healthcare, – Source: NA ADM49/, Numbers of Workmen in Royal Naval Dockyards – Note: Deptford and Woolwich Dockyards closed in Cited by: 2.